How to Do A Pull Up and Inverse Row Like A Boss

The V-shaped back is an essential part of the perfect body.Besides that, the back is one of the most important areas of the body to build up. Why? Because it’s been the most commonly diagnosed area of injury for at least 100 years. People are consistently throwing out their backs among other related injuries (including cervical) due to a lack of strength. Many attribute this to old age, which is a quack of an idea. There are plenty of people who have been recorded in tribes where the men are required to continue to work (READ: Maintain activity) and with that maintenance keep their musculature and appearance.

Old age happens when you let it happened my friends.

Today’s post will take the pull-up and inverse row, and teach you how to build muscle using both.Read on to find out more.

Pull-up:

Grasp the wall mounted pull up bar with the grip that you feel most comfortable or is easiest (usually underhand), distance between hands should be around shoulder width.

Your body should be hanging in a vertical position, including legs (unless using an assistance machine). Your muscles should be tightened, including the core to avoid swinging and screwing up the motion (should be going up not sideways).

All your going to do from here is simply pull up! This can be until the chest hits the bar or the chin is over the bar.

There are a few variations of the pull-up which you can pursue, but make sure you’ve mastered the most basic version first and apply that knowledge and form to the other variations.

Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core

The V-shaped back is an essential part of the perfect body. Besides that, the back is one of the most important areas of the body to build up. Why? Because it's been the most commonly diagnosed area of injury for at least 100 years. People are consistently throwing out their backs among other related injuries (including cervical) due to a lack of strength. Many attribute this to old age, which is a quack of an idea. There are plenty of people who have been recorded in tribes where the men are required to continue to work (READ: Maintain activity) and with that maintenance keep their musculature and appearance. Old age happens when you let it happened my friends. Today's post will take the pull-up and inverse row, and teach you how to build muscle using both. Pull-up: Grasp the wall mounted pull up bar with the grip that you feel most comfortable or is easiest (usually underhand), distance between hands should be around shoulder width. Your body should be hanging in a vertical position, including legs (unless using an assistance machine). Your muscles should be tightened, including the core to avoid swinging and screwing up the motion (should be going up not sideways). All your going to do from here is simply pull up! This can be until the chest hits the bar or the chin is over the bar. There are a few variations of the pull-up which you can pursue, but make sure you've mastered the most basic version first and apply that knowledge and form to the other variations. Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core Inverse Row: This is a great exercise that targets a wide variation of people due to being less "complex" than the pull-up while still requiring focus and strength of beginning and expert exercisers. You can complete this motion at a smith machine or in a squat rack. You can grab a bench, box, or something stable and place it in-front of a squat rack (wall mounted pull up bar) or a smith machine. The distance between the two objects should be enough for your body to be stretched out horizontally. The bar (in the rack/smith machine) should be high enough to make the movement challenging, but don't get too ahead of yourself. Lowering it would obviously make the motion easier; and so would putting your feet on the ground instead of the secondary object. With your feet on the ground or on the bench, place your hands about shoulder-width apart on the bar with an overhand grip (you can switch grips up later). Make sure your body is straight and keep this form; a lot of people tend to turn into a valley while doing this motion, which is NOT what's supposed to happen. While maintaining form, pull your upper body up to the bar. Pause, lower the back to the starting position (meaning back to straight, not rest), and repeat. The bar should come into contact with your chest. Like I said, making it easier could just mean putting your feet on the ground or lowering the bar. Making it more difficult would mean leaving your feet on an object; heightening the bar, switching grips, and possibly wearing a weight vest (if you believe you're advanced enough). Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core The pull-up and inverse row are simple functional pull exercises that can build plenty of muscle while keeping the movement interesting. Incorporate them into your routine with proper form and you're well on your way to a strong back using wall mounted pull up bar.

Inverse Row:

This is a great exercise that targets a wide variation of people due to being less “complex” than the pull-up while still requiring focus and strength of beginning and expert exercisers.

You can complete this motion at a smith machine or in a squat rack.

You can grab a bench, box, or something stable and place it in-front of a squat rack (wall mounted pull up bar) or a smith machine.

The distance between the two objects should be enough for your body to be stretched out horizontally.

The bar (in the rack/smith machine) should be high enough to make the movement challenging, but don’t get too ahead of yourself. Lowering it would obviously make the motion easier; and so would putting your feet on the ground instead of the secondary object.

With your feet on the ground or on the bench, place your hands about shoulder-width apart on the bar with an overhand grip (you can switch grips up later). Make sure your body is straight and keep this form; a lot of people tend to turn into a valley while doing this motion, which is NOT what’s supposed to happen.

While maintaining form, pull your upper body up to the bar. Pause, lower the back to the starting position (meaning back to straight, not rest), and repeat. The bar should come into contact with your chest.

Like I said, making it easier could just mean putting your feet on the ground or lowering the bar. Making it more difficult would mean leaving your feet on an object; heightening the bar, switching grips, and possibly wearing a weight vest (if you believe you’re advanced enough).

Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core

The pull-up and inverse row are simple functional pull exercises that can build plenty of muscle while keeping the movement interesting. Incorporate them into your routine with proper form and you’re well on your way to a strong back using wall mounted pull up bar.For more details read here https://redefiningstrength.com/the-pull-up-vs-the-inverted-row/

 

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