How To Improve Your Pull Ups!

How To Improve Your Pull Ups!

The wall-mounted pull up bar are one of the best latissimus dorsi exercises. They are also ideal for arm and upper back development. One of the best physical fitness benchmarks is an ability to lift your bodyweight and nothing screams “physically fit” much more than being able to bust a dozen pull ups without breaking a sweat. So, what if you can’t even do half a repetition? How do you improve your pull ups? Are there any methods you can use in order to increase your rep count and increase your other rep count (reputation)? Absolutely, and we will be looking at these methods!

How To Improve Your Pull Ups!

  1. Assisted pull up machine – This machine is awesome for IMPROVING your pull ups. The key word is “improving”. If you’ve been going to the gym for a year and you still use the assisted pull up machine then you clearly missed the point of it all. The general idea is to incrementally REDUCE the support the machine gives you in order to make the repetitions a little bit harder each time. Every time you go to the assisted pull up machine, make sure you’re always improving. Always be reducing the assistance the machine gives you and once you are done, go to the pull up bar and attempt a whole repetition. If you can do a few reps, then you may also want to consider wall-mounted pull up bar…
  2. Negative pull ups – You got it! These are awesome for improving your overall performance on the pull up bar. But don’t be going on the pull up bar and asking your friend to push you up. Not quite. You want to perform an entire set of regular pull ups to failure and then if you have a friend, have them push you up so you can slowly bring yourself down on the negative. It works best when your muscles are fried. An even better way would be to use your feet to pull yourself up. Sort of like running up the wall like Kung Fu master’s do (works if the bar is mounted against a vertical wall). This works because you are still working the biceps on the upward movement as you still need to hold on to the bar.
  3. Pulldowns – Pulldowns do a phenomenal job of conditioning your biceps and lats for moving heavy weights. Getting nasty at pulling down lots of weight always translates into enviable performance on the pull up bar. Pulldowns are most difficult with a wide grip and as always in the world of fitness, the more difficult it is, the better it is for you.
  4. Barbell bicep curls – Barbell curls mimic part of the concentric movement of the pull up and working to curl heavier weights will undoubtedly improve your ability to pull yourself up. Keep working on these and as your bicep strength increases, so does your ability to pull yourself up.

Discover more about back workouts and the best wall-mounted pull up bar exercises. Drop by our website and learn how to build muscle.For more details read here http://jasonferruggia.com/top-10-ways-to-improve-your-pull-ups/

Pull Ups Vs Chin Ups

Pull Ups Vs Chin Ups

The pull up bar is known to be one of the most efficient pieces of gym equipment for bolstering upper body strength, though you can use your wall-mounted pull up bar for a variety of exercises, the two most popular are the pull up and chin up. Though the two terms are often used interchangeably, the question persists: Which exercise is more effective? For more details read here https://www.pullupbarninja.com/wall-mounted-pull-up-bars

Both exercises involve hanging on a pull up bar and lifting your own body weight until your chin rises above the level of the bar (some even say chest to the bar). There is, however, a distinction between these two very popular body weight workouts, despite that both involve gripping and pulling one’s own body weight upward.

So what, then, is the difference?

Well, it all lies in the grip. Take note, however, this subtle difference in the hand position, results to a whole new set of muscle is targeted and surprisingly one is harder to perform than the other. The pull up exercise using wall-mounted pull up bar is characterized by gripping the bar with arms stretched upwards, hands facing away from you. Many upper body muscles, specifically your back, are employed, which is one reason that it is so difficult.

Universally, the pull up is seen as the more difficult exercise because you don’t have the benefit of using your bicep muscles. The chin up is performed the exact same way, except that your palms and fingers are facing you. This slightly noticeable contrast affects the muscles that are targeted. In short, the grip changes the muscles used. Chin ups concentrate more on your biceps and shoulders, which is why it is easier to perform. Since it is easier to complete, you are also more likely to do more repetitions.

Pull Ups Vs Chin Ups

If you think about it, you cannot really say that one is better than the other. According to the Crossfit Journal, both exercises should be done interchangeably, without preference for grip. The official word is to simply “mix it up.” Although the chin up is easier, it is considered to be on par with the pull up.

To get the most out of both exercises, here are some helpful tips to maximize your efforts: You should begin from a full “hanging” position. Then, lead with your chest first, inhale while going down and exhale when you come up. Imagine your elbows going down into the ground and don’t flex the arm.

Whether you prefer pull ups or chin ups, you will tremendously benefit from either exercise. Incorporating pull ups and chin ups in your workout will definitely help you to continue on your path to better fitness.

If you would like more quality fitness tips, workouts techniques and equipment reviews for your at-home gym, especially your wall-mounted pull up bar, visit us now. Our site is dedicated to helping people becoming healthier and stronger by supplying Crossfit-style workouts, tips and product information for their home gym. For more information, please visit us here.

The V-shaped back is an essential part of the perfect body. Besides that, the back is one of the most important areas of the body to build up. Why? Because it's been the most commonly diagnosed area of injury for at least 100 years. People are consistently throwing out their backs among other related injuries (including cervical) due to a lack of strength. Many attribute this to old age, which is a quack of an idea. There are plenty of people who have been recorded in tribes where the men are required to continue to work (READ: Maintain activity) and with that maintenance keep their musculature and appearance. Old age happens when you let it happened my friends. Today's post will take the pull-up and inverse row, and teach you how to build muscle using both. Pull-up: Grasp the wall mounted pull up bar with the grip that you feel most comfortable or is easiest (usually underhand), distance between hands should be around shoulder width. Your body should be hanging in a vertical position, including legs (unless using an assistance machine). Your muscles should be tightened, including the core to avoid swinging and screwing up the motion (should be going up not sideways). All your going to do from here is simply pull up! This can be until the chest hits the bar or the chin is over the bar. There are a few variations of the pull-up which you can pursue, but make sure you've mastered the most basic version first and apply that knowledge and form to the other variations. Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core Inverse Row: This is a great exercise that targets a wide variation of people due to being less "complex" than the pull-up while still requiring focus and strength of beginning and expert exercisers. You can complete this motion at a smith machine or in a squat rack. You can grab a bench, box, or something stable and place it in-front of a squat rack (wall mounted pull up bar) or a smith machine. The distance between the two objects should be enough for your body to be stretched out horizontally. The bar (in the rack/smith machine) should be high enough to make the movement challenging, but don't get too ahead of yourself. Lowering it would obviously make the motion easier; and so would putting your feet on the ground instead of the secondary object. With your feet on the ground or on the bench, place your hands about shoulder-width apart on the bar with an overhand grip (you can switch grips up later). Make sure your body is straight and keep this form; a lot of people tend to turn into a valley while doing this motion, which is NOT what's supposed to happen. While maintaining form, pull your upper body up to the bar. Pause, lower the back to the starting position (meaning back to straight, not rest), and repeat. The bar should come into contact with your chest. Like I said, making it easier could just mean putting your feet on the ground or lowering the bar. Making it more difficult would mean leaving your feet on an object; heightening the bar, switching grips, and possibly wearing a weight vest (if you believe you're advanced enough). Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core The pull-up and inverse row are simple functional pull exercises that can build plenty of muscle while keeping the movement interesting. Incorporate them into your routine with proper form and you're well on your way to a strong back using wall mounted pull up bar.

How to Do A Pull Up and Inverse Row Like A Boss

The V-shaped back is an essential part of the perfect body.Besides that, the back is one of the most important areas of the body to build up. Why? Because it’s been the most commonly diagnosed area of injury for at least 100 years. People are consistently throwing out their backs among other related injuries (including cervical) due to a lack of strength. Many attribute this to old age, which is a quack of an idea. There are plenty of people who have been recorded in tribes where the men are required to continue to work (READ: Maintain activity) and with that maintenance keep their musculature and appearance.

Old age happens when you let it happened my friends.

Today’s post will take the pull-up and inverse row, and teach you how to build muscle using both.Read on to find out more.

Pull-up:

Grasp the wall mounted pull up bar with the grip that you feel most comfortable or is easiest (usually underhand), distance between hands should be around shoulder width.

Your body should be hanging in a vertical position, including legs (unless using an assistance machine). Your muscles should be tightened, including the core to avoid swinging and screwing up the motion (should be going up not sideways).

All your going to do from here is simply pull up! This can be until the chest hits the bar or the chin is over the bar.

There are a few variations of the pull-up which you can pursue, but make sure you’ve mastered the most basic version first and apply that knowledge and form to the other variations.

Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core

The V-shaped back is an essential part of the perfect body. Besides that, the back is one of the most important areas of the body to build up. Why? Because it's been the most commonly diagnosed area of injury for at least 100 years. People are consistently throwing out their backs among other related injuries (including cervical) due to a lack of strength. Many attribute this to old age, which is a quack of an idea. There are plenty of people who have been recorded in tribes where the men are required to continue to work (READ: Maintain activity) and with that maintenance keep their musculature and appearance. Old age happens when you let it happened my friends. Today's post will take the pull-up and inverse row, and teach you how to build muscle using both. Pull-up: Grasp the wall mounted pull up bar with the grip that you feel most comfortable or is easiest (usually underhand), distance between hands should be around shoulder width. Your body should be hanging in a vertical position, including legs (unless using an assistance machine). Your muscles should be tightened, including the core to avoid swinging and screwing up the motion (should be going up not sideways). All your going to do from here is simply pull up! This can be until the chest hits the bar or the chin is over the bar. There are a few variations of the pull-up which you can pursue, but make sure you've mastered the most basic version first and apply that knowledge and form to the other variations. Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core Inverse Row: This is a great exercise that targets a wide variation of people due to being less "complex" than the pull-up while still requiring focus and strength of beginning and expert exercisers. You can complete this motion at a smith machine or in a squat rack. You can grab a bench, box, or something stable and place it in-front of a squat rack (wall mounted pull up bar) or a smith machine. The distance between the two objects should be enough for your body to be stretched out horizontally. The bar (in the rack/smith machine) should be high enough to make the movement challenging, but don't get too ahead of yourself. Lowering it would obviously make the motion easier; and so would putting your feet on the ground instead of the secondary object. With your feet on the ground or on the bench, place your hands about shoulder-width apart on the bar with an overhand grip (you can switch grips up later). Make sure your body is straight and keep this form; a lot of people tend to turn into a valley while doing this motion, which is NOT what's supposed to happen. While maintaining form, pull your upper body up to the bar. Pause, lower the back to the starting position (meaning back to straight, not rest), and repeat. The bar should come into contact with your chest. Like I said, making it easier could just mean putting your feet on the ground or lowering the bar. Making it more difficult would mean leaving your feet on an object; heightening the bar, switching grips, and possibly wearing a weight vest (if you believe you're advanced enough). Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core The pull-up and inverse row are simple functional pull exercises that can build plenty of muscle while keeping the movement interesting. Incorporate them into your routine with proper form and you're well on your way to a strong back using wall mounted pull up bar.

Inverse Row:

This is a great exercise that targets a wide variation of people due to being less “complex” than the pull-up while still requiring focus and strength of beginning and expert exercisers.

You can complete this motion at a smith machine or in a squat rack.

You can grab a bench, box, or something stable and place it in-front of a squat rack (wall mounted pull up bar) or a smith machine.

The distance between the two objects should be enough for your body to be stretched out horizontally.

The bar (in the rack/smith machine) should be high enough to make the movement challenging, but don’t get too ahead of yourself. Lowering it would obviously make the motion easier; and so would putting your feet on the ground instead of the secondary object.

With your feet on the ground or on the bench, place your hands about shoulder-width apart on the bar with an overhand grip (you can switch grips up later). Make sure your body is straight and keep this form; a lot of people tend to turn into a valley while doing this motion, which is NOT what’s supposed to happen.

While maintaining form, pull your upper body up to the bar. Pause, lower the back to the starting position (meaning back to straight, not rest), and repeat. The bar should come into contact with your chest.

Like I said, making it easier could just mean putting your feet on the ground or lowering the bar. Making it more difficult would mean leaving your feet on an object; heightening the bar, switching grips, and possibly wearing a weight vest (if you believe you’re advanced enough).

Areas of muscles worked: Back, biceps, shoulders, core

The pull-up and inverse row are simple functional pull exercises that can build plenty of muscle while keeping the movement interesting. Incorporate them into your routine with proper form and you’re well on your way to a strong back using wall mounted pull up bar.For more details read here https://redefiningstrength.com/the-pull-up-vs-the-inverted-row/